Sample Syllabus

Positive Behavioral and Social Supports


Positive Behavioral and Social Supports

3 Semester Credits
Graduate
Special Education Licensure

Sample Syllabus

Positive Behavioral and Social Supports


  1. Syllabus Used in Course for: Special education teacher candidates for mild/moderate (ages 5-22) and moderate/severe (ages 5-22) credentials; Dual special education/multiple subject teacher candidates; Master of Arts degree in Special Education
  2. Instructor:

    Note to User: Include contact information in this section.

    Department:
    Office:
    Phone:
    E-mail Address:
    Office Hours:

  3. Course Description: Drawing upon research in the field, Positive Behavioral and Social Supports is designed to present an array of research-based strategies and techniques for strengthening appropriate behaviors and reducing challenging behaviors in students. Both the theoretical foundations of behavior and behavioral interventions, as well as the actual “how to” apply the strategies for effective behavior management will be addressed. Candidates will gain an understanding of how both undesirable behaviors and desirable behaviors are directly related to the contexts in which they occur; the functions that undesirable behaviors serve for students; and how to best use this information to design effective preventative and management interventions for use in the classroom. Relevant federal and state legislation and ethical considerations will be discussed.

    This course is web-enhanced. Access to Blackboard will be required to fully participate in the course. Candidates are required to regularly

    1. Use their University email account, and
    2. Access Blackboard to download and print documents, formats and rubrics for assignments, class notes, readings, and resources.

    These materials will be placed in the “Course Documents” folder on Blackboard. The University provides free email accounts to all students. Candidates may sign up online.

    Pre-requisites: Requires admission to the special education credential program and successful completion of Introduction to Teaching, Introduction to Special Education, and Assessing Students with Special Needs. Candidates must have successfully completed any specified pre-requisite coursework and field experience.

  4. Required Texts/Readings:

    A Series of 12 Units*: Functional Behavioral Assessment, Analyzing Data/ Designing Behavior Intervention Plans, Implementation & Progress Monitoring created by the NYC Department of Education by Carol Dawson, Ed.D., Director of Behavior Support and Angela McBride, M.S. Ed., Director of Evaluation and Eligibility Division of Specialized Instruction and Student Support. Modules will be made available on Blackboard.

    *The authors of this resource refer to these units as modules. To avoid confusion with IRIS STAR Legacy Modules, this series of 12 modules are referred to as units within the IRIS Sample Syllabus.

    Positive Environments, Network of Trainers (PENT). (2013). The BIP desk reference: A teacher and behavior intervention team’s guide to developing and evaluating behavior intervention plans. D. B. Wright & G. Cafferata (Eds.). Retrieved from http://www.pent.ca.gov/dsk/BIPdeskreference2013.pdf

    Articles: Access via Blackboard and the Library

    Andeson, C. M., & Borgmeier, C. (2010). Tier 11 interventions within the framework of SWPBS: Essential features for design, implementation, and maintenance. Behavior Analysis in Practice 3(1), 33-45.
    Arum, R., & Ford. F. (2012). How other countries “do discipline.” Educational Leadership, 70(2), 56-60.
    Conroy, M. A., Sutherland, K. S., Snyder, A., Al-Hendawi, M., & Vo, A. (2009). Creating a positive classroom atmosphere: Teachers’ use of effective praise and feedback. Beyond Behavior, 18(2), 18-26.
    Fox, L., & Clarke, S. (2006). Aggression? Using positive behavior support to address challenging behavior. Young Exceptional Children Monograph Series, 8, 42-56.
    Maag, J. W., & Katsiyannis, A. (2012). Bullying and students with disabilities: Legal and practice considerations. Behavioral Disorders, 37(2), 78-86.
    Macias-Smith, N. (2012). Developing and supporting teachers’ ability to prevent & reduce restraint and seclusion. Retrieved from https://www.disabilityrightsohio.org/assets/documents/teachers_prevent_seclusion_restraint.pdf?pdf=teachers_prevent_restraint
    Menzies, H. M., Lane, K. L., & Lee, J. M. (2009). Self-monitoring strategies for use in the classroom: A promising practice to support productive behavior for students with emotional or behavioral disorders. Beyond Behavior, 18(2), 27-35.
    National Disability Rights Network. (2010, January). School is not supposed to hurt: Update on progress in 2009 to prevent and reduce restraint and seclusion in schools. Retrieved from http://www.ndrn.org/images/Documents/Resources/Publications/Reports/School-is-Not-Supposed-to-Hurt-NDRN.pdf
    Ryan, J. B., & Katsiyannis, A. (2009). The importance of teacher involvement in medication therapy. TEACHING Exceptional Children Plus, 6(2), 1-12.
    Sayeski, K. & Brown, M. (2011). Developing a classroom management plan using a tiered approach. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 44(1), 8-17.
    Shippen, M. E., Simpson, R. G., & Crites, S. A. (2003). A practical guide to functional behavioral assessment. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 35(5), 36-44.
    Simonsen, B., Fairbanks, S., Briesch, A., Myers, D., & Sugai, G. (2008). Evidence-based practices in classroom management: Considerations for research to practice. Education and Treatment of Children, 31(3), 351-380.
    Strain, P. S., & Hemmeter, M. L. (1997, November). Keys to being successful when confronted with challenging behaviors. Young Exceptional Children 1(1), 2-8.

Sample Syllabus

Positive Behavioral and Social Supports


  1. The Conceptual Framework: At the heart of the conceptual framework for the professional education unit at this University is its theme, Leadership for Diverse Communities. The unit’s philosophy, purposes, professional commitments, and dispositions are found in the vision, mission, goals, and dispositions articulated below.

    The Mission of the School: The School of Education’s mission is the recruitment and development of ethically informed leaders for classroom teaching, education administration, counseling, and higher education. This National Council of Accreditation in Teacher Education (NCATE1) accredited unit fosters the candidate dispositions of collaboration, valuing diversity, critical thinking, ethical judgments, reflection, and life-long learning. Our mission is realized through a framework of teaching, scholarship, and services that addresses regional, state, national, and international perspectives. The School of Education (SOE) prepares highly competent educators, while providing professional support and leadership to the community, promoting applied research, and providing experiences and opportunities that will enable employed professionals to remain current in their fields.

    Candidates attend classes, study, and work in a state-of-the-art Education Building, which is a five-story facility that includes clinical areas and computer and microteaching laboratories. Candidates also take classes and experience fieldwork in professional settings such as school districts and the Counseling Center. The SOE fosters the realization of human potential by preparing those who work in the field of education and human development to function more effectively and productively in a mutable and increasingly diverse society. The SOE theme, “Leadership for Diverse Communities,” places considerable emphasis on an educator who can function effectively as a leader in a culturally and linguistically diverse society.

    Vision: The SOE is a center for academic excellence and collaboration in the fields of education and counseling. Graduates will be community leaders who advocate high standards and democratic values with attention to professional ethics and diversity. Integration of educational technology and performance assessment is essential to all programs.

    Goals: The specific goals of the SOE are as follows:

    • to recruit qualified candidates who are representative of the diversity in our community into the fields of education and counseling, beginning with students in the public schools;
    • to be at the cutting edge of the application of best practice models and educational technology;
    • to prepare education professionals who have a command of content knowledge and pedagogy and who continuously strive to improve their practice;
    • to support the lifelong development of practicing professionals with services and programs, including the doctorate;
    • to prepare professionals who are committed to leadership and service in diverse community settings;
    • to integrate performance assessment as a key evaluation technique in each of our programs;
    • to sustain a university work environment that is exemplary in its humanity, ethics, effectiveness, and intellectual vitality;
    • to secure, through advancement efforts, the supplemental funding needed to provide the margin of excellence for programs and special initiatives; and
    • to be the higher education partner of choice for the public schools and other relevant institutions of the counties we serve.
  2. Standards of Effective Practice:The School of Education has adopted the State’s Licensure Standards and NCATE Accreditation Standards*, which refer to the Council for Exceptional Children’s (CEC) Special Education Preparation Standards. *In the next accreditation cycle, this university will transition to the merged professional education accreditation body, the Council for the Accreditation of Education Professionals (CAEP).
  3. Course Objectives:

    Note to User: Be sure to include your states’ special educator preparation standards in the table below.

    By the end of the semester candidates will:

    Learning Outcomes NCATE1 State
    Program
    Standards**
    TPE*** CEC****
    1. Describe and interpret applicable laws, rules and regulations, and procedural safeguards regarding the planning and implementation of management of student behaviors
    1.a 2 12 I 6.1
    1. Give examples of the significant impact school variables have on student learning and behavior
    1.b 12 8 I 6.2
    1. Give examples of teacher behavior (i.e. attitudes, beliefs, expectations that positively or negatively influence student behavior)
        5 A 3.2
    1. Describe cultural influences on the management of student behavior
    1.c, 1.d 3, 11 7 I 1.1,6.3, A 3.2, 7.1
    1. Identify methods for keeping parents and caregivers informed about their student’s work and behavior at school
    1.c, 1.c 4, 11 8, 11 I 2.1
    1. Work collaboratively with general education teachers and other professionals to provide effective positive behavior support
    1.c, 1.d 4, MM 4 6 I 2.1,7.2, A 5.3
    1. Demonstrate effective collaborative skills in planning interventions for instructional and behavioral support partnerships with parents/families.
    1.c 4, MM 3 11 I 2.1,7.3, A 5.3
    1. Demonstrate effective communication skills between teachers and students to develop a supportive peer culture in the classroom
    1.g 4, 12, MS 2 4, 11 A 7.1
    1. Demonstrate an awareness of characteristic social/affective needs, of individuals with exceptionalities, that influence their behavior at school
    1.c, 1.d 4, 11, MM 1, 3   I 5.1, A 3.2
    1. Identify teaching materials, strategies, and programs used in meeting social/affective needs of exceptional and culturally diverse individuals
    1.b, 1.c 4, 11, MM 2, 3 7 I 5.1,A 3.2, 3.3, 5.2, 7.1
    1. Illustrate an understanding of the three-tiered model of positive behavior support and the three levels of intervention: primary, secondary and tertiary strategies
    1.d, 3.c MM 3, 4, MS 4   A 3.3
    1. Develop an effective classroom management plan for responding to minor and major behavior disruptions in the learning environment.
    1.c, 1.g MM 3, 4, MS 4 11 A 3.3, 4.3
    1. Apply behavior expectations and standards that support a safe, positive learning environment in the classroom.
    3.c MM 4, MS 4   I 2.3, A 5.2
    1. Modify the learning environment (schedule and physical arrangement) to manage inappropriate behaviors
    3.c 13, MS 4 9 I 3.3, A 3.3
    1. Teach students appropriate self-regulatory strategies to cope with difficult or unpredictable situations.
    3.c MM 4, MS 4 5 I 5.7
    1. Design and implement a comprehensive positive behavior support plan to address challenging behavior, using single subject design to collect, record, graph, and evaluate intervention effectiveness.
    1.a MM 4, MS 4   I 3, 4.2, A 1.2, 3.3

    1Due to variations in accreditation cycles, some universities have not yet made the transition to CAEP standards and are still guided by NCATE standards. The university from which this syllabus originated is one of these.
    ** MM refers to standards specific to mild/moderate special education credential standards. MS refers to standards specific to moderate/severe special education credential standards.
    *** TPE refers to specific State teacher performance expectations.
    **** “I” refers to CEC Initial Special Education Preparation Standards. “A” refers to CEC Advanced Special Education Preparation Standards.

  1. Instructional Strategies:
    • Lecture
    • Small and Large Group Discussion and Activities
    • Case Study Analysis
    • Project Assignments in Practicum Setting
    • Reading Reflections
  2. Diversity:

    Note to User: Be sure to include your university’s diversity statement here.

    Diversity is an integral part of the fabric of the State’s past, present and future, and, therefore an essential element of academic excellence at this University. We are committed to promoting the success of all, and working to address and reduce barriers to success related to differences in areas such as race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, culture, religion, linguistic diversity, disability, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, geographical region, and more.

Sample Syllabus

Positive Behavioral and Social Supports


  1. Course Requirements:

    Assignment Policies

    1. Each candidate is responsible for completing assignments and readings prior to each class session, in order to actively participate in discussions, activities, and presentations.
    2. Assignments for this class must be each candidate’s own work.
    3. All assignments must be completed independently/individually, except where otherwise indicated.
    4. All assignments must follow the formats/instructions provided in the syllabus or on Blackboard.
      1. It is the candidate’s responsibility to obtain and follow all formats/instructions exactly and to seek clarification if needed.
    5. Most assignments have a rubric (evaluation) available.
      1. It is the candidate’s responsibility to obtain and attach the rubric to its corresponding assignment. Assignments submitted without the appropriate rubric will receive a 5-point deduction from the total points possible.
    6. All assignments will be submitted in paper copy or online via Blackboard and follow the guidelines listed below:
      1. Write in narrative. Word-process, using 1″ margins, 12-point font, and 1.5 spaces between lines. Paper assignments must be stapled. Do not use paperclips (papers get lost that way).
      2. Use transition sentences, phrases, and words between ideas and paragraphs.
      3. Label with headings within each assignment to identify each section of the paper. Refer to the “Areas to be Evaluated” in each rubric to determine the headings.
    7. Check and correct spelling, organization, syntax, structure, grammar, and mechanics. PROOFREAD AND SPELLCHECK your assignments prior to submission. If you have extensive errors you may be asked to resubmit your assignment.
    8. Assignment Timelines/Due Dates
      1. All assignments are due in paper copy as you enter the classroom on the date the assignment is due, in order to be eligible to receive full credit/points. It is the candidate’s responsibility to submit all assignments on time.
      2. Any assignment submitted late (after the beginning of the session in which it is due and until one week after the due date) will receive a 20% point deduction. Assignments will not be accepted after one week late. Do NOT email assignments.
      3. Confidentiality. The privacy and identity of children and their families should be protected in all written materials. Therefore, when writing about a child, the recommended language is, “For the purpose of this paper, I will refer to the observed student as________(fictitious first name).”

    Participation

    Active involvement in learning increases what is remembered, how well it is assimilated, and how the learning is used in new situations. This is especially true in a course that stresses application of material. Extensive participation in class discussions and activities is an essential element of your learning. As such, being prepared to participate in discussions is a course requirement. This entails having read, annotated, and thought about the complete assignment carefully before class starts. More broadly speaking: Ask questions. Be curious. You are more than welcome to have a different interpretation of a text than a classmate or me; just be sure to share your perspective in a productive and supportive manner. Each teacher candidate will be assigned to a Team (group of 3 to 4 candidates). Both professor and candidates share the responsibility for the learning that occurs in the classroom. This sharing of responsibility is demonstrated by mutual preparation, and use of a variety of activities and/or techniques to address course content. If a candidate is absent, she/he misses the participation grade and can’t make up for it.

    Graded Assignments

    Response to Readings (50 points): There are 14 weeks of required readings listed on the syllabus. Each candidate must respond to 10 of 14 readings. Readings are designed to help you think critically about research in special education and to assist you in the development and completion of all course assignments. Reading responses will be negotiated with individual students. A choice of reading prompts will be provided. Ways to respond may look like written paragraphs, audio or video recording, article annotations, concept/mind mapping, etc. Uploaded reading responses are due the day before class by 10 p.m. You will be asked to share your response to readings in class. Therefore, late submissions will not be accepted. (Candidate Dispositions: Reflection, Critical Thinking, Professional Ethics, Collaboration, and Valuing Diversity). Completion of Functional Behavioral Assessment Training Units* (90 points): Teacher candidates will complete activities designed to provide content and practice in conducting a Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA) and writing a Behavior Support Plan (BSP). Unit activities are to be completed by the date listed on the course schedule/week-at-a-glance. (LS Standard 8; Candidate Dispositions: Reflection, Critical Thinking, Valuing Diversity, Professional Ethics, Lifelong Learning)
    * The authors of this resource refer to these units as modules. To avoid confusion with IRIS STAR Legacy Modules, the FBA to BSP Training Modules are referred to as units within the IRIS Sample Syllabus.

    Functional Behavioral Assessment and Behavior Support Plan (105 points): Candidates will be guided through training units, IRIS Modules, in class lecture and activities to complete a FBA and BSP for one student identified as having challenging behaviors. Guidelines are included on Blackboard in the Guidelines and Rubrics folder under Course Documents. Steps to complete a FBA and BSP are listed below. (Candidate Dispositions: Reflection, Professional Ethics, Collaboration, Lifelong Learning)

    Part 1: Conduct FBA

    • Step 1: Define the Target Behavior in Observable and Measurable Terms
    • Step 2: Complete Indirect Assessments (Teacher and Student Interviews)
    • Step 3: Complete Direct Assessments (A-B-C Analysis)
    • Step 4: Complete Summary of Behavior and Hypothesis Statement
    • Step 5: Complete Competing Pathways Summary

    Part 2: Write Behavior Intervention Plan

    • Step 6: Identify and Write Replacement Behavior and Positive Behavior Goals
    • Step 7: Identify Teaching Strategies Related to Replacement Behavior
    • Step 8: Identify Reinforcement Procedures and Reactive Strategies
    • Step 9: Describe Communication Tasks

    Part 3: Implementation of Intervention

    • Step 10: Collect Baseline Data for FERB Goal
    • Step 11: Implement Intervention<
    • Step 12: Graph Baseline and Intervention Data
    • Step 13: Summarize Results, Make Recommendations, and Write a Reflection of the Process

    Classroom Management Plan (45 points): Each candidate will design a classroom management plan for his or her classroom and specific student population. The plan must include the development of rules and expectations; relationship building with students, colleagues and family members; strategies for increasing student engagement and for providing quality instruction; appropriate responses to minor misbehavior; interventions for students with challenging behaviors; and a crisis management plan to respond to behavioral and medical emergencies. Guidelines are included on Blackboard in the Guidelines and Rubrics folder under Course Documents. (Candidate Dispositions: Reflection, Critical Thinking)

    Assignment and Examination Schedule

    Due Date Assignment Points
      Response to Readings 50
      Completion of FBA Units* 90
      Functional Behavioral Assessment, Behavior Support Plan, Implementation 105
      Classroom Management Plan 45
         
      Total Points Possible 290
  2. Evaluation:
    1. The total points received on each assignment are recorded in the grade roster on Blackboard.
    2. Grades are calculated by percentage (the total points received divided by the total points possible).
    Grade % Points
    A 90 – 100
    B 80 – 89
    C 70 – 79
    D 60 – 69
    F Below 60

Sample Syllabus

Positive Behavioral and Social Supports


 
  1. Class Schedule/Week at a Glance

    Note: The schedule and procedures for this course are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances.

    Week Topics Required Readings Assignments
    Due
    1 Introductions/ Review Syllabus and Course Assignments Course Syllabus  
    Tier I: Universal Interventions
    2

    Introduce Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports

    Evidence-based Practices in Classroom Management

    Components of a Comprehensive Behavior Management Plan

    IRIS Module: Classroom Management (Part 2): Developing Your Own Comprehensive Classroom Management Plan (Pages 1-2)

    Article
    Sayeski & Brown (2011)

    Syllabus Quiz

    Reading Response

    In-class Activity

    3

    Overview Tier I Interventions (Clarifying & Teaching Expected Behaviors)

    IRIS Module: Classroom Management (Part 2): Developing Your Own Comprehensive Classroom Management Plan (Pages 3-5)

    Article
    Conroy, Sutherland, Snyder & Marsch (2008)

    Reading Response

    In-class Activity

    4

    Overview Tier 1 Interventions (Encouraging Expected Behaviors & Discouraging Inappropriate Behaviors)

    Classroom Management Plan Guidelines: Steps 5-7 (Pages 6-10)

    IRIS Module: Classroom Management Part 2: Developing Your Own Comprehensive Classroom Management Plan (Pages 6-8)

    Article
    Strain & Hemmeter (1997)

    Reading Response

    In-class Activity

    Tier II: Targeted Interventions
    5

    Overview Tier 2 Interventions

    Building Relationships with Colleagues, Parents, and Students

    Classroom Management Plan Guidelines: Steps 8-9 Pages 10-11

    IRIS Module: Addressing Disruptive Noncompliant Behaviors (Part 1): Understanding the Acting-Out Cycle

    IRIS Module: Addressing Disruptive Noncompliant Behaviors (Part 2): Behavioral Interventions

    Article
    Moses (1987)

    Anderso n & Borgmeier (2010)

    Reading Response

    Due for Review:

    Classroom Management Plan Steps 1-5

    In-class Activity

    6

    Overview of Functional Behavioral Assessment/ Tier 3 Interventions

    IRIS Module: FBA (Pages 1-5) including activities from Module

    FBA Unit 1: Defining Behavior

    FBA Unit 2: ABCs Understanding Behavior

    Due for Review:

    Classroom Management Plan Steps 6-9

    Activities for Units* 1 & 2

    Tier III: Intensive Individualized Interventions
    7

    FBA: Indirect Measures

    IRIS Module: FBA (Page 6)

    FBA Guidelines Pages 16-20

    FBA Unit 3: Indirect Data/ Interviewing

    Article
    Shippen, Simpson & Crites (2003)

    Reading Response

    Activities for Unit* 3

    8

    FBA: Direct Measures

    IRIS Module: FBA (Page 7)

    FBA Unit 4: Observing Direct Data

    Article
    Fox & Clarke (2006)

    Reading Response

    Final Classroom Management Plan Due

    Activities for Unit* 4

    9

    FBA: Building a Hypothesis/ Identifying Data Collection Tools

    Hypothesis Verification

    Data Collection Tools

    IRIS Module: FBA (Pages 8-10)

    FBA Guidelines Pages 25-28

    FBA Unit 5: Developing a Hypothesis

    FBA Unit 6: Data Collection Tools

    FBA Indirect Assessments Due for Review

    Activities for Units* 5 & 6

    10

    Overview of Behavior Intervention Planning/ Competing Pathways Summary

    FBA Guidelines Pages 28-35

    FBA Unit 7: Competing Pathway Diagram

    BIP Desk Reference Section 1 – Pages 5-14

    BIP Desk Reference Section 4 – BIP Lines 1-4

    Activities for Unit* 7

    11

    Function-based Support Strategies, Teaching & Reinforcement

    FBA Guidelines Pages 28-44

    FBA Unit 8: Function-based Strategies

    FBA Unit 9: BIP

    BIP Desk Reference Sections 5, 6, 7 & 8; BIP Lines 5-12

    Activities for Units* 8 & 9

    Special Challenges
    12

    Behavioral Goals & Communication & Teaming

    Graphing Baseline and Intervention Data

    BIP Desk Reference Section 9: BIP Line 13

    BIP Desk Reference Section 10: BIP Line 14

    Reading Response

    FBA Direct Assessments Due for Review

    In-class Activity

    13

    Medication and Students with Disabilities

    SPED Law, Suspension & Expulsion, Manifestation Determination

    Articles
    Case Law: Parents v FUSD
    Ryan & Katsiyannis (2009)

    Reading Response

    Answer Case Law Questions

    In-class Activity

    THANKSGIVING RECESS
    14

    SPED Laws and Guidelines Regarding Restraint & Seclusion

    Bullying and Students with Disabilities

    Articles

    Macias-Smith (2012)

    National Disability Rights Network (2012)

    Magg & Katsiyannis (2012)

    Mayer & Ybarra (2003)

    Reading Response

    Final FBA & BIP Due

    In-class Activity

    15 Consultation Days—No Class
    16 FBA and BIP Presentations No New Readings FBA and BIP Presentations

    The authors of this resource refer to these units as modules. To avoid condusion with IRIS STAR Legacy Modules, the FBA to BSP Training modules are referred to as units within the IRIS Sample Syllabus.

Sample Syllabus

Positive Behavioral and Social Supports


13. Other Resources and Materials

  • IRIS Resources
    • STAR Legacy Modules
      • Addressing Disruptive and Noncompliant Behaviors (Part 1): Understanding the Acting-Out Cycle. The first in a two-part series, this module discusses problem behavior in terms of the stages of the acting-out cycle and suggests ways to respond to students in the cycle’s different phases (est. completion time: 1 hour). When you have completed this module, be sure to learn more in a part two: Addressing Disruptive and Noncompliant Behaviors (Part 2): Behavioral Interventions.
        https://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/bi1/
      • Addressing Disruptive and Noncompliant Behaviors (Part 2): Behavioral Interventions. The second in a two-part series, this module describes interventions that can increase initial compliance to teacher requests as well as interventions that can be implemented to decrease disruptive and noncompliant behaviors.
        https://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/bi2/
      • Classroom Management (Part 2): Developing Your Own Comprehensive Behavior Management Plan. This module—a revision of You’re in Charge! Developing Your Own Comprehensive Behavior Management Plan—reviews the major components of classroom management (including rules, procedures, and consequences) and guides users through the steps of creating their own comprehensive behavior plan (est. completion time: 2 hours). The module is a companion to Classroom Management (Part 1): Learning the Components of a Comprehensive Behavior Management Plan.
        https://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/beh2/
      • Functional Behavioral Assessment: Identifying the Reasons for Problem Behavior and Developing a Behavior Plan. This module explores the basic principles of behavior and the importance of discovering the reasons that students engage in problem behavior. The steps to conducting a functional behavioral assessment and developing a behavior plan are described.
        https://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/fba/
    • Websites
      • Behavior Advisor. Developed by Dr. Thomas McIntyre, this Website offers thousands of positive and respectful strategies and interventions for promoting appropriate behavior (in kids AND the adults who serve them).
        http://www.behavioradvisor.com
      • The Behavior Home Page. The Kentucky Department of Education (KDE) and the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation Counseling at the University of Kentucky (SERC) collaborated on this Web page on student behavior for many years. The purpose is to provide a format that allows school personnel, parents, and other professionals to gain access to information, to share effective practices, and to receive ongoing consultation and technical assistance concerning the full range of behavior problems and challenges displayed by children and youth in school and community settings, as well as other behavioral issues that may affect their success in school.
        http://www.state.ky.us/agencies/behave/bi/bi.html
      • California Special Education Law Wiki. The goal of this Wiki is to help parents of children with special needs, as well as special education attorneys and advocates, to more easily access, understand and make sense of California special education administrative hearing decisions and related legalese in an intuitive interface with enhanced search capabilities.
        http://www.californiaspecialedlaw.com/wiki/
      • California Services for Technical Assistance and Training (CalSTAT). CalSTAT is a special project of the California Department of Education, Special Education Division, located at Napa County Office of Education. It is funded through the Special Education Division and the California State Personnel Development Grant (SPDG). The SPDG, a federal grant, supports and develops partnerships with schools and families by providing training, technical assistance and resources to both special education and general education.
        http://www.calstat.org
      • Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports. The Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is a national technical assistance and dissemination project that enhances knowledge and the practical demonstration of school-wide PBIS practices, systems, and outcomes. Though this site provides a plethora of online resources in Classroom and Behavior Management, the Tools and Videos for Schools are particularly useful in the areas of SWPBIS for Beginner, Primary Level, Secondary Level, and Tertiary Level. This site also includes information and resources about differentiated behavioral instruction and intervention, diverse learners, and RTI. The center reports the findings of effective evidence-based practices from technical assistance and dissemination efforts that can be implemented on a large scale.
        http://www.pbis.org/
      • Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL). CSEFEL offers materials related to the social-emotional development and school readiness of infants, toddlers, and young children. Information on evidence-based practices can be found under Research Syntheses and What Works Briefs. Training modules and videos on various topics related to behavior and social emotional development are also available.
        http://csefel.vanderbilt.edu/
      • Intervention Central. Intervention Central provides teachers, schools, and districts with free resources on behavior interventions to match a wide variety of circumstances, including defusing and de-escalation, effective teacher communication techniques, self-management strategies, schoolwide behavior management, and more.
        http://www.interventioncentral.org/behavioral-intervention-modification
      • The IRIS Center. The IRIS Center offers a wide variety of resources and services to suit a diverse set of instructional needs and circumstances. The Center develops and provides free, online teaching and learning tools, instructional and content Modules, and other materials for improving the knowledge and skills of faculty, professional development providers, educators, and independent learners.
        https:iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu
      • The Kansas Institute for Positive Behavior Supports (KIPBS). KIPBS conducts research, provides training from the intensive to the community-wide intervention level, develops resources, and helps professionals plan and implement PBS within their organizations.
        http://www.kipbs.org
      • PENT Positive Environments Network of Trainers California Department of Education. The Positive Environments, Network of Trainers is a California Positive Behavior Initiative designed to provide information and resources for educators striving to achieve high educational outcomes through the use of proactive positive strategies. Evidence-based positive practices and helpful information are disseminated statewide through this Website. PENT was co-founded by Diana Browning Wright and Deborah Holt, in a joint effort between the Diagnostic Center, Southern California (DCSC) and the Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA). The collaborative PENT network is dedicated to increasing academic achievement and overcoming behavioral barriers to success for all students with and without disabilities.
        http://www.pent.ca.gov/
      • Positive Behavior Interventions and Support at School. Maintained and updated by Tary Tobin, a Research Associate at the University of Oregon, this website provides references and links to recent articles and resources related to PBIS. These resources are especially useful for parents and teachers.
        http://pages.uoregon.edu/ttobin/
      • Special Education Law Blog. This blog is a special education legal resource discussing case law, news, practical advocacy advice, and developments in state and federal laws, statutes and regulations. Postings include insight and sometimes humor from Charles P. Fox, a Chicago, Illinois attorney who is also a parent of child with special needs, and other guest authors.
        http://blog.foxspecialedlaw.com/
      • Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children (TACSEI). TACSEI takes the research that shows which practices improve the social-emotional outcomes for young children with, or at risk for, delays or disabilities and creates FREE products and resources to help decision-makers, caregivers, and service providers apply these best practices in the work they do every day. Most of these free products are available right here on our website for you to immediately view, download and use.
        http://challengingbehavior.fmhi.usf.edu
      • TACSEI Make and Take Workshops. Make and Take Workshops are workshops designed to provide information on a focused topic with the opportunity to “make and take” materials back to the classroom. Practitioners who make materials to use are much more likely to implement the strategies in their classrooms. The Make and Take materials posted here are for experienced Pyramid Model trainers to use.
        http://challengingbehavior.fmhi.usf.edu/communities/make_n_take/make_n_take_home.html
      • What Works Clearing House. The What Works Clearinghouse reviews research on educational practices and programs and provides information to make evidence-based decisions. It offers a variety of helpful resources, including ‘Find What Works,’ which summarizes and compares the evidence level of interventions, ‘Practice Guides,’ which present recommendations about addressing classroom challenges, and ‘Intervention Reports,’ which summarize high-quality research findings for practices and programs.
        http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/
      • Wrights Law. A special education advocacy website created by Peter W. D. Wright and Pamela Darr Wright. This website provides numerous advocacy resources for parents, teachers, administrators, and other stakeholders about various topics, including explanations of legal guidelines related to special education.
        http://www.wrightslaw.com/info/discipl.index.htm

    Detailed Rubric for Functional Behavioral Assessment and Behavior Intervention Plan Assignment

    Outcomes Achieved 5 pts or 9-10 pts Developing 3-4 pts or 6-8 pts Limited 1-2 pts or 1-5 pts Not Met 0 pts Score
    Part 1: Conduct Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA)
    Step 1: Define Problem in Operational Terms (5 pts) Behavior is operationally defined (specific, observable, and measurable) Operational definition has 1-2 required characteristics (specific, observable, and measurable) Target behavior is not defined in terms that are specific, observable, and measurable    
    Step 2: Indirect Assessments  (10 pts)  Interviewed teacher and student; gathered thorough information on antecedents and consequences for problem behavior Interviewed teacher and student; gathered some information on antecedents and consequences for problem behavior Failed to interview both teacher and student; gathered minimal information on antecedents and consequences for problem behavior    
    Step 3: Direct Assessments  (10 pts)  At least 5 occurrences of the targeted behavior are represented in ABC data collection; data collected in setting(s) where behavior most often occurs; a recurring pattern of antecedents and consequences are clearly indicated At least 3-4 occurrences of the targeted behavior are represented in ABC data collection; data collected in setting(s) where behavior most often occurs; recurring pattern of antecedents and consequences are indicated Fewer than 3 occurrences of targeted behavior are recorded; data not always collected in setting(s) where behavior most often occurs; recurring pattern of antecedents and consequences not clearly indicated    
    Step 4: Summary of Behavior and Hypothesis Statement (5 pts) Hypothesized function of behavior includes all information in template; is clearly aligned with and supported by collected data Hypothesized function of behavior includes all information in template, but is not clearly aligned with and supported by collected data Hypothesized function of behavior does not include all information in template; OR not clearly aligned with and supported by collected data    
    Step 5: Competing Pathways Summary (10 pts) Three pathways have been completed (7 steps) accurately based on data collected from FBA; Identifies appropriate functionally equivalent replacement behavior (FERB) based on hypothesized function of student behavior; Teaching strategies that make problem behaviors irrelevant, ineffective, and inefficient have been identified and are related to FERB Three pathways have been completed (7 steps) based on data collected from FBA; Identifies appropriate FERB based on hypothesized function of student behavior; Teaching strategies have been identified and are related to FERB Three pathways, FERB goal and/or teaching strategies are incomplete    
    Part 2: Write Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP)
    Step 6: Identify and Write Functionally Equivalent Replacement Behavior (FERB) goal (5 pts) Writes complete FERB goal achieving same functional outcomes to the problem behavior under similar conditions Writes partially complete FERB goal achieving same functional outcomes to the problem behavior under similar conditions FERB goal meets some but not all template components    
    Step 7: Identify Teaching Strategies Related to Replacement Behavior (10 pts) Identifies instructional strategies; provides detailed plans to teach the replacement behavior  Identifies instructional strategies; provides plans to teach the replacement behavior Some teaching strategies are identified; plan to teach FERB is partially developed or weak     
    Step 8: Identify Reinforcement Procedures and Reactive Strategies (10 pts) Reinforcement procedures are clearly outlined and relate to identified student interests; identifies all 4 components of reactive strategies; provides detailed plans to implement  Reinforcement procedures are outlined but may not relate to identified student interests; identifies some components of reactive strategies; provides plans to implement  Reinforcement procedures are minimally outlined and do not relate to identified student interests; identifies some reactive strategy components; plans to implement are partial or weak     
    Step 9: Communication Tasks (5 pts) All implementers (those who will monitor and exchange information) are identified AND their responsibilities are clearly delineated. Some implementers (those who will monitor and exchange information) are identified AND their responsibilities are clearly delineated. Not all implementers are identified or not all responsibilities are discernable.    
    Part 3: Implementation of Intervention, Results, and Reflection
    Step 10: Collect Baseline Data for FERB Goal (5 pts) Baseline data is recorded over three to five sessions Baseline data is recorded over three sessions; Baseline data is recorded over 1 to 2 sessions    
    Step 11: Implement Intervention (10 pts) FERB goal is discussed as beneficial, modeled, and opportunities for practice provided with corrective feedback FERB goal is modeled and opportunities for practice provided with corrective feedback FERB goal is taught but with few details regarding procedures    
    Step 12: Graph Baseline and Intervention Data (10 pts) All intervals count by the same number of units and a reasonable interval was used; numbers clearly correspond with graph lines; graph has a clear title and clear labels for both axes, and the unit measured is clearly stated; graph starts at 0.0; dependent variable is on y-axis; independent variable is on the x-axis. All intervals count by the same number of units; numbers clearly correspond with graph lines; graph has a title and labels for both axes, and the unit the variable is measured in is included; graph starts at 0.0; dependent variable is on y-axis; independent variable is on the x-axis. Intervals may not count by the same number of units; may be unclear what the numbers correspond with (space or line); graph has title or labels for both axes, or the unit the variable is measured in; graph may or may not start at 0.0; variables may not be on the correct axes    
    Step 13: Summarize Results, Make Recommend-
    ations, and Write Reflection of Process (10 pts)
    Summary is based on results of FBA, BIP, and implementation and evaluation of behavior goal. Recommend-
    ations are thoughtful and show an excellent understanding of the process.
    Summary is based on results of FBA, BIP, and implementation and evaluation of behavior goal. Recommend-
    ations are thoughtful and show an adequate understanding of the process.
    Summary is based on results of FBA, BIP, and implementation and evaluation of behavior goal. Recommend-
    ations show a limited understanding of the process.
       
    Total Score  

Sample Syllabus

Positive Behavioral and Social Supports


  1. Special Accommodations

    Note to User: Be sure to include your university’s statement about special accommodations/students with disabilities here.

    Upon identifying themselves to the instructor and the university, students with disabilities will receive reasonable accommodations for learning and evaluation. For more information, contact Services to Students with Disabilities.

  2. Other Course Policies

    Classroom Environment

    1. Keep audible communication devices (cell phones, pagers, IPods, and other portable media players) turned off during class.
    2. Use of laptops, computers, and/or PDAs is permitted only for in-class note-taking or for supporting your presentations. No other use is acceptable.
    3. Obtain advanced permission from the instructor for visitors.

    Attendance

    A meta-analysis of the relationship between class attendance in college and college grades reveals that attendance has strong relationships with both class grades and GPA. These relationships make class attendance a better predictor of college grades than any other known predictor of academic performance, including scores on standardized admissions tests such as the SAT, high school GPA, study habits, and study skills (Crede, M., Roch, S. G. & Kieszczynka, U. M., 2010, in Review of Education Research).

    The Special Education Faculty place great importance on attendance and participation, as these are professional expectations. More than 2 absences (excused or unexcused), and/or excessive tardiness or leaving early may result in a lowered letter grade. Being asked more than once, in any class period, to turn off electronic devices will result in a recorded absence.

    1. If you are absent, tardy, or leave early, excused or unexcused, it is your responsibility to do all of the following:
      1. Obtain handouts, notes, and other materials from peers. The instructor does not keep copies beyond the class session in which these were given.
      2. Submit late assignments before or not later than the beginning of the following session. Points will be deducted for all late assignments.

    University Policies

    Honor Code: “Members of the University’s academic community adhere to principles of academic integrity and mutual respect while engaged in university work and related activities.” You should: understand or seek clarification about expectations for academic integrity in this course (including no cheating, plagiarism and inappropriate collaboration) neither give nor receive unauthorized aid on examinations or other course work that is used by the instructor as the basis of grading. Take responsibility to monitor academic dishonesty in any form and to report it to the instructor or other appropriate official for action. Instructor may require students to sign a statement at the end of all exams and assignments that “I have done my own work and have neither given nor received unauthorized assistance on this work.”

    Cheating and Plagiarism: “Cheating is the actual or attempted practice of fraudulent or deceptive acts for the purpose of improving one’s grade or obtaining course credit; such acts also include assisting another student to do so. Typically, such acts occur in relation to examinations. However, it is the intent of this definition that the term ‘cheating’ not be limited to examination situations only, but that it include any and all actions by a student that are intended to gain an unearned academic advantage by fraudulent or deceptive means. Plagiarism is a specific form of cheating which consists of the misuse of the published and/or unpublished works of others by misrepresenting the material (i.e., their intellectual property) so used as one’s own work.” Penalties for cheating and plagiarism range from a 0 or F on a particular assignment, through an F for the course, to expulsion from the university. For more information on the University’s policy regarding cheating and plagiarism, refer to the Class Schedule (Legal Notices on Cheating and Plagiarism) or the University Catalog (Policies and Regulations).

    Computers: “At the University, computers and communications links to remote resources are recognized as being integral to the education and research experience. Every student is required to have his/her own computer or have other personal access to a workstation (including a modem and a printer) with all the recommended software. The minimum and recommended standards for the workstations and software, which may vary by academic major, are updated periodically and are available from Information Technology Services or the University Bookstore. In the curriculum and class assignments, students are presumed to have 24-hour access to a computer workstation and the necessary communication links to the University’s information resources.”

    Disruptive Classroom Behavior: The classroom is a special environment in which students and faculty come together to promote learning and growth. It is essential to this learning environment that respect for the rights of others seeking to learn, respect for the professionalism of the instructor, and the general goals of academic freedom are maintained… Differences of viewpoint or concerns should be expressed in terms which are supportive of the learning process, creating an environment in which students and faculty may learn to reason with clarity and compassion, to share of themselves without losing their identities, and to develop and understanding of the community in which they live… Student conduct, which disrupts the learning process, shall not be tolerated and may lead to disciplinary action and/or removal from class.

    Copyright Policy: Copyright laws and fair use policies protect the rights of those who have produced the material. The copy in this course has been provided for private study, scholarship, or research. Other uses may require permission from the copyright holder. The user of this work is responsible for adhering to copyright law of the U.S. (Title 17, U.S. Code). To help you familiarize yourself with copyright and fair use policies, the University encourages you to visit its Copyright Web Page.