Resources

Page 10: References & Additional Resources

To cite this Module, please use the following:

The IRIS Center. (2009). Universal Design for Learning: Creating a Learning Environment that Challenges and Engages All Students. Retrieved from https://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/udl/

Resources

The Access Center. (n.d.). Differentiated instruction. Retrieved on February 27, 2009, from http://www.k8accesscenter.org/index.php/category/differentiate-instruction/

The Access Center. (n.d.). Special education and access terminology. Retrieved on February 27, 2009, from http://www.k8accesscenter.org/training_resources/terminology.asp

The Access Center. (n.d.). Universal design to support access to the general education curriculum. Retrieved on October 16, 2008, from http://www.k8accesscenter.org/training_resources/UniversalDesign.asp

Barsch, J. R. (1996). Barsch Learning Style Inventory. Novato, CA: Academic Therapy Publications.

Casper, B., & Leuichovius, D. (2005). Universal design for learning and the transition to a more challenging academic curriculum: Making it in middle school and beyond. Retrieved on October 16, 2008, from http://www.ncset.org/publications/viewdesc.asp?id=2165

CAST. (n.d.). Chapter 5: Using UDL to set clear goals. Retrieved on October 29, 2008, from http://www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/ideas/tes/chapter5_3.cfm

CAST. (n.d.). Curriculum access for students with low-incidence disabilities: The promise of UDL. Retrieved on October 16, 2008, from http://www.cast.org/publications/ncac/ncac_lowinc_section5.html

CAST. (n.d.). UDL questions and answers. Retrieved on October 10, 2008, from http://www.cast.org/research/faq/index.html

CAST. (2008). Universal design for learning guidelines version 1.0. Retrieved on August 11, 2009, from http://www.cast.org/publications/UDLguidelines/version1.html

CAST. (n.d.) What is universal design for learning? Retrieved on October 9, 2008, from http://www.cast.org/research/udl/index.html

The Center for Universal Design. (1997). Table 1. Principles of universal design in architecture and other areas. Retrieved on August 11, 2009, from http://www.design.ncsu.edu/cud/pubs_p/docs/poster.pdf

Council for Exceptional Children. (2005). Universal design for learning: A guide for teachers and educational professionals. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Doyle, M. B., & Giangreco, M. F. (2009). Making presentation software accessible to high school students with intellectual disabilities. Teaching Exceptional Children, 41(3), pp. 24–31.

Firchow, N. (n.d.). Universal design for learning: Improved access for all. Retrieved on October 14, 2008, from http://www.greatschools.net/cgi-bin/showarticle/2490

Gaines, O. (2005). Lesson plan #3506: Cell division. Retrieved on August 11, 2009, from http://teachers.net/lessonplans/posts/3506.html

Hall, T., Strangman, N., & Meyer, A. (n.d.). Differentiated instruction and implications for UDL implementation. Wakefield, MA: National Center on accessing the General Curriculum. Retrieved on October 16, 2008, from http://www.cast.org/publications/ncac/ncac_diffinstructudl.html

Hitchcock, C., Meyer, A., Rose, D., & Jackson, R. (2002). Providing new access to the general curriculum: Universal design for learning. Teaching Exceptional Children, 35(2), pp. 8–17.

Hitchcock, C., & Stahl, S. (2003). Assistive technology, universal design, universal design for learning: Improved learning opportunities. Journal of Special Education Technology, 18(4), pp. 45–52.

Jackson, R. M. (2004). Technologies supporting curriculum access for students with disabilities. Wakefield, MA: National Center on Accessing the General Curriculum. Retrieved on October 16, 2008, from http://www.cast.org/publications/ncac/ncac_techsupport.html

Jackson, R., Harper, K., & Jackson, J. (2001). Effective teaching practices and the barriers limiting their use in accessing the curriculum: A review of recent literature. Peabody, MA: Center for Applied Special Technology, Inc. Retrieved on October 10, 2008, from http://www.cast.org/publications/ncac/ncac_effectivetp.html

National Center for Learning Disabilities. (n.d.). Universal design Q&A for educators and administrators. Retrieved on October 18, 2011, from http://www.ncld.org/at-school/especially-for-teachers/universal-design-for-learning/universal-design-qaa-for-educators-and-administrators

Nolet, V., & McLaughlin, M. (2000). Accessing the general curriculum: Including students with disabilities in standards-based reform. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, Inc.

O’Neill, L. (2001). A 21st century mission: The first CAST institute on universal design for learning. The Exceptional Parent, 31(2), pp. 22–25.

Okolo, C. M. (2006). Online assessments in the content areas: What are they good for? Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(2), pp. 67–73.

Orkwis, R., & McLane, K. (1998). A curriculum every student can use: Design principals for student access. Reston, VA: ERIC/ OSEP Special Project (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 423645). Retrieved from ERIC database.

Orkwis, R. (2003). Universally designed instruction. Reston, VA: ERIC/ OSEP Special Project (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 475386). Retrieved from ERIC database.

Ozden, M. Y., Erturk, I., & Sanli, R. (2004). Students’ perceptions of online assessment: A case study. Journal of Distance Education, 19(2), pp. 77–92.

Rose, D., & Meyer, A. (2006). A practical reader in universal design for learning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.

Rose, D., Meyer, A., & Edyburn, D. (2008, April 3). Universal design for learning: Guidelines for practice and research. Presented at Council for Exceptional Children National Convention, Boston, MA.

Rose, D., Meyer, A., & Hitchcock, C. (2005). The universally designed classroom: Accessible curriculum and digital technologies. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.

Rose, D., & Meyer, A., Strangman, Y., & Rappolt, G. (2002). Teaching every student in the digital age: Universal design for learning. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Salend, S. (2009). Using technology to create and administer accessible tests. Teaching Exceptional Children, 41(3), pp. 40–51.

Smith, D., & Tyler, N. (2010). Introduction to special education: Making a difference (7th Ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson.

Stock, S. E., Davies, D. K., & Wehmeyer, M. L. (2004). Internet-based multimedia tests and surveys for individuals with intellectual disabilities. Journal of Special Education Technology, 19(4), pp. 43–47

Strangman, N., Hall, T., & Meyer, A. (2004). Background knowledge instruction and the implications for UDL implementation. Wakefield: MA: National Center on Accessing the General Curriculum. Retrieved on October 16, 2008, from http://www.cast.org/publications/ncac/ncac_backknowledgeudl.html

TES Site Mentor. (n.d.). Model two: Finding UDL solutions. Retrieved on November 6, 2008, from http://www.cast.org/teachingeverystudent/content/mentors/site_mentor/site_mentor.cfm

University of South Florida, Department of Education. (n.d.). Creating a rubric: Tutorial. Retrieved on August 11, 2009, from http://health.usf.edu/publichealth/eta/Rubric_Tutorial/default.htm

Additional Resources

Articles

The ACCESS Project, Colorado State University. (n.d.). What is Universal Design for Learning? Retrieved on August 11, 2009, from http://accessproject.colostate.edu/udl/documents/what_is_udl.pdf

This Website contains a veritable wealth of information related to Universal Design for Learning, including movies, audio files, and transcripts. Included are overviews of UDL (including a history of the philosophy behind the practice), prescriptions for implementing UDL principles into the general education classroom, and links to resources for students and faculty.

Andrade, H. G. (1997). Understanding rubrics. Educational leadership, 54(4). Retrieved on March 4, 2009 from http://www.middleweb.com/rubricsHG.html

This useful resource offers an overview of rubrics, why they are useful, and how to go about creating them. A look at the possible expanded use of rubrics—at home, for example—is included.

Edyburn, D. L. (2010). Would you recognize universal design for learning if you saw it? Ten propositions for new directions for the second decade of UDL. Learning Disability Quarterly, 33, 33–41.

This paper expands and elaborates on an early article (also published in Learning Disability Quarterly). In it, the author offers a detailed examination of the history and institutional context of universal design for learning, as well as speculation about future developments for the approach. Ten propositions for that future are offered and discussed.

Flores, M. (2008). Universal design in elementary and middle school: Designing classrooms and instructional practices to ensure access to learning for all students. Childhood Education, 84(4), pp. 224–229.

In this article, the author overviews Universal Design for Learning (here called Universal Design for Instruction [UDI]) with a particular focus on the method’s usefulness in elementary and middle-school classrooms.

Goodman, G., & Williams, C. M. (2007). Interventions for increasing the academic engagement with autism spectrum disorders in inclusive classrooms. Teaching Exceptional Children, 39(6), pp. 53–61.

The authors here detail their observations and field-tested outcomes involving the effectiveness of universally designed interventions in increasing the participation of students with autism spectrum disorder in the general education classroom. A focus is placed on the idea of individually designed interventions with special attention to the unique needs of every student.

Jackson R., & Harper, K. (2001). Teacher planning and the Universal Design for Learning environments. Peabody, MA: Center for Applied Technology, Inc. Retrieved on October 16, 2008, from http://www.cast.org/publications/ncac/ncac_teacherplanning.html

This article promotes the effectiveness of the UDL principles, while also offering concrete examples of their application in the general education classroom. Collaborative teaching is also given special emphasis.

Kortering, L. J., McClannon, T. W., & Braziel, P. M. (2008). Universal design for learning: A look at what algebra and biology students with and without high incidence conditions are saying. Remedial and Special Education, 29(6), pp. 352–363.

Here the authors present their findings on what a group of students (among them students with high-incidence disabilities) perceived about their interactions with Universal Design for Learning principles. Their findings reveal that the students found UDL much to their liking and voiced hopes that their teachers would use more of it in their instruction. A discussion of the implications of these outcomes is included.

Kurtis, S. A., Matthews, C. E., & Smallwood, T. (2009). (Dis)Solving the differences: A physical science lesson using universal design. Intervention in School and Clinic, (44)3, 151–159.

In this article, the authors set about showing the ways in which a lesson in science can be adapted using the principles of Universal Design for Learning.

National Universal Design for Learning Task Force. (n.d.). UDL: The facts for educators. Retrieved on November 15, 2011, from http://udl4maryland.webs.com/UDLEducatorsFactSheet.pdf

This general overview provides a brief but informative introduction to the UDL method, answering questions such as “What is Universal Design and Universal Design for Learning?” “What are the benefits of UDL?” and “What are the principles of UDL?”

Sopko, K. M. (2009, April). Universal Design for Learning: Policy challenges and recommendations. Retrieved on August 13, 2009, from http://www.projectforum.org/

This paper, supported by the U.S. Department of Education, offers an overview of federal regulatory language related to universal design for learning (UDL). Included are proposals from various panel presentations on the UDL concept.

Strangman, N., Hitchcock, C., Hall, T., Meo, G., & Coyne, P. (2008). Response-to- instruction and Universal Design for Learning: How might they intersect in the general education classroom? Retrieved on August 11, 2009, from http://www.k8accesscenter.org/documents/RTIandUDLFinal2.pdf

As its title suggests, this article undertakes an examination of RTI and UDL and proposes ways that they might interact in general education classrooms to the benefit of today’s diverse learners.

Thompson, S., & Thurlow, M. (2002). Universal designed assessments: Better tests for everyone! (Policy Directions No. 14). Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. Retrieved on October 16, 2008, from http://cehd.umn.edu/nceo/OnlinePubs/Policy14.htm

The authors posit that the increased emphasis on testing in today’s schools requires immediate efforts to universally design those tests to be as accessible as possible for today’s diverse learners. Here they present a number of clearly articulated principles through which to carry out this aim, including “Plain Language Editing Strategies” and “Dimensions of Legibility and Characteristics of Maximum Legibility.”

Thompson, S. J., Johnstone, C. J., & Thurlow, M. L. (2002). Universal design applied to large scale assessments (Synthesis Report 44). Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes. Retrieved October 14, 2008, from http://cehd.umn.edu/NCEO/OnlinePubs/Synthesis44.html

This paper sets out to explore the effect of UDL principles on large-scale assessments. It establishes and examines seven key of universally designed assessments, including “inclusive assessment population,” “accessible, non-biased items,” and “amenable to accommodations.” Suggestions for designing universally accessible assessments are included.

U.S. Department of Education. (2009, April). American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009: Using ARRA funds to drive school reform and improvement. Retrieved on August 13, 2009, from http://www.ed.gov/policy/gen/leg/recovery/guidance/uses.doc

U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. (n.d.). Tool kit on teaching and assessing students with disabilities. Retrieved on August 11, 2009, from http://www.osepideasthatwork.org/toolkit/index.asp

This online resource, made available by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Plans, includes a Tool Kit on Universal Design for Learning with links to a host of outside information and materials. Among these is an Instructional Practices page as well as one devoted to Assessment.

Online Resources

Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST). (2011). Universal design for learning guidelines, version 2.0. Retrieved on September 10, 2015, from http://www.udlcenter.org/aboutudl/udlguidelines

Designed to assist classroom instructors who seek to develop courses of study or curricula that are more easily accessible by all of their students, these guidelines developed by the Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST) include a detailed explanation of UDL, links to examples and resources to support UDL implementation, and an overview of the current research into UDL effectiveness. A section detailing the three primary principles of universal design for learning offers a deeper understanding of the framework.

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