Resources

Page 9: References Additional Resources and Information

To cite this Module, please use the following:

The IRIS Center. (2008). Collaborating with families. Retrieved from https://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/fam/

References

Appleseed Network. (2007). It takes a parent: Transforming education in the wake of the No Child Left Behind Act. Retrieved September 18, 2007, from http://www.appleseednetwork.org/bPublicationsb/OtherResources/tabid/609/Default.aspx

Beach Center on Disability. (2007). Positive adaptations and coping strengths of families who have children with disabilities. Retrieved August 24, 2007, from http://www.beachcenter.org/resource_library/beach_resource_detail_page.aspx?intResourceID=1315

Beach Center on Disability. (2007). Positive perceptions of disability fact sheet. Retrieved August 8, 2007, from http://www.beachcenter.org/resource_library/beach_resource_detail_page.aspx?intResourceID=1476

Beach Center on Disability. (2007). Real story: Marie and me. Retrieved August 8, 2007, from http://www.beachcenter.org/resource_library/beach_resource_detail_page.aspx?intResourceID=616

Beach Center on Disability. (2007). Tip: Cultural diversity. Retrieved August 27, 2007, from http://www.beachcenter.org/resource_library/beach_resource_detail_page.aspx?intResourceID=46

Beach Center on Disability. (2007). Tip: How can service providers develop trust with parents of children with disabilities? Retrieved August 8, 2007, from http://www.beachcenter.org/resource_library/beach_resource_detail_page.aspx?intResourceID=1419

Carter, S. (2003). Education our children together: A sourcebook for effective family-school-community partnerships. Eugene, OR: Consortium for Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education. Available from http://www.directionservice.org/cadre/EducatingOurChildren_01.cfm

Colorado Parent Information Resources Center. (2007). Epstein’s framework of six types of involvement. Retrieved October 31, 2007, from http://www.cpirc.org

Council for Exceptional Children. (1983). CEC code of ethics for educators of persons with exceptionalities. Retrieved on 15 August, 2008, from http://www.cec.sped.org/content/navigationmenu/ProfessionalDevelopment/ProfessionalStandards/EthicsPracticeStandards/default.htm

Epstein, J., Sanders, M. G., Simon, B. S., Salinas, K. C., Jansorn, N. R., & Van Voorhis, F. L. (2002). Schools, family, and community partnerships: Your handbook for action (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press.

Epstein, J. L., & Sheldon, S. B. (2006). Moving forward: Ideas for research on school, family, and community partnerships. In C. F. Conrad & R. Serlin (Eds.), SAGE Handbook for research in education: Engaging ideas and enriching inquiry (pp. 117–138). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.

Ferguson, C. (2005). Reaching out to diverse populations: What can schools to foster family-school connections? Austin, TX: Southwest Educational Development Laboratory.

Henderson, A. T., & Mapp, K. L. (2002). A new wave of evidence: The impact of school, family, and community connections on student achievement. Austin, TX: Southwest Educational Development Laboratory.

Johnston, T. (2007). Trust improves schools. Retrieved January 17, 2008, from http://www.gsb.stanford.edu/news/headlines/seli_conf_110504.shtml

Lim, S. (2008). Parent involvement in education. In G. Olsen & M. L. Fuller (Eds.), Home-school relations: Working successfully with parents (pp. 127–150). Boston: Pearson Education.

MacDonald, J. B. (2008). Teachers and parenting: Multiple views. In G. Olsen & M. L. Fuller (Eds.), Home-school relations: Working successfully with parents (pp. 86–103). Boston: Pearson Education.

May, J. (1992). Loss and grief: The paradox of pain. Retrieved August 24, 2007, from http://www.fathersnetwork.org/652.html

May, J. (1997). What is Family? Retrieved August 24, 2007, from http://www.fathersnetwork.org/561.html

May, J. (2001). Enhancing family resilience: “Pants first, then our shoes.” Retrieved August 24, 2007, from http://www.fathersnetwork.org/762.html

May, J. (2007). Working with Diverse Families. Retrieved August 24, 2007, from http://www.fathersnetwork.org/644.html

McClure, P. (2002). Parents’ right to know about their child’s and school’s achievement. Baltimore, MD: National Network of Partnership Schools.

Moses, K. (2002). Childhood disability: A parent’s struggle. Retrieved August 16, 2007, from http://www.pediatricservices.com/prof/prof-15.htm

National Coalition for Parent Involvement in Education. (2006). A new wave of evidence: The impact of school, family and community connections on student achievement. Retrieved August 18, 2007, from http://www.ncpie.org/WhatsHappening/researchJanuary2006.html

National Education Association. (2006). Getting involved in your child’s education. Retrieved August 16, 2007, from http://wy.nea.org/parents/index.html No longer available.

NCLB reauthorization: Effective strategies for engaging parents and communities in schools before the Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions of the U. S. Senate, March 28, 2007 (testimony of Anne Henderson).

Parent Teacher Association. (2007). PTA position: Parent involvement. Retrieved May 31, 2007, from http://www.pta.org/topic_parent_involvement.asp

Project Appleseed. (2007). The parental involvement checklist. Retrieved August 27, 2007, from http://www.projectappleseed.org/chlst.html

Project Appleseed. (2007). The parental involvement pledge. Retrieved August 27, 2007, from http://www.projectappleseed.org/pledge.html

Regents of the University of Minnesota. (2005). Introduction to family involvement standards—National Alliance for Secondary Education and Transition. Retrieved August 14, 2007, from http://www.nasetalliance.org/family/index.htm

Regents of the University of Minnesota. (2005). Supporting research for family involvement standards—National Alliance for Secondary Education and Transition. Retrieved October 2, 2007, from http://www.nasetalliance.org/family/research.htm

South Carolina Department of Education. (2006). Red Carpet Schools information. Retrieved October 31, 2007, from http://www.ed.sc.gov/visitors/educators/red_carpet/RedCarpetSchoolsInformationPage.html

Stuyvesant, S. (2006). Where are the parents? Retrieved September 20, 2007, from http://www.tsbvi.edu/Outreach/seehear/summer99/parents.htm

United States Department of Commerce: Economics and Statistics Administration. Disability and American families: 2000. Washington, DC: U. S. Census Bureau.

United States Department of Education. (2005). Facts and terms every parent should know about NCLB. Retrieved August 24, 2007, from http://www.ed.gov/nclb/overview/intro/parents/parentfacts.html

Whitehead, K. M., Bruder, M. B., Fleming, G., & Park, H. J. (2007). Collaboration in special education: Parent-professional training. Teaching Exceptional Children, 39(4), pp. 6–14.

Ziolko, M. E. (1991). Counseling parents of children with disabilities: A Review of the literature and implications for practice. Retrieved March 12, 2008, from http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0825/is_n2_v57/ai_10984317/print

Additional Resources

Article

Sawyer, M. (2015). Bridges: Connecting with families to facilitate and enhance involvement. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 47(3), 172–179.

This article contains step-by-step details on how educators might more fully involve the families of their students in the learning environment. Included are tips of the week, notes on recruiting parents for greater participation, and information on the critical importance of communication between families and educators.

Book

Gill, B. (1997). Changed by a child: Companion notes for parents of a child with a disability. Garden City, NY: Doubleday.

This book contains vignettes written by the parents of children with disabilities. Topics are written from the parents’ perspective and include education, transition, parenting, grieving, and others.

Research Paper

Harris, A., & Goodall, J. (n. d.) Engaging parents in raising achievement: Do parents know they matter? University of Warwick.

This paper, commissioned by the Specialist Schools and Academies Trust and funded by the Department of Education and Skills, was emailed to Amy Harris from Sharman at the PACER Center on December 14, 2007.

Web Resources

Colorado Parent Information and Resource Center (CPIRC) http://www.cpirc.org

This site offers information on parental involvement in education, focusing particularly on early childhood education and No Child Left Behind. CPIRC provides teacher training, professional development, and technical assistance services, in addition to disseminating information to the public regarding parental involvement.

Family Village – A Global Community of Disability-Related Resources http://www.familyvillage.wisc.edu

This site contains informational resources on specific diagnoses, adaptive products, technology, disability-related readings, and more for persons with disabilities, their families, and those that offer services to persons with disabilities.

Harvard Family Research Project—Family Involvement Makes a Difference http://www.hfrp.org/publications-resources/publications-series/family-involvement-makes-a-difference

These publications from the Harvard Family Research Project serve as guides to family involvement at the elementary, middle, and high-school levels. Emphasis is placed on parenting issues for children of each age as well as on home-school relationships.

Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Website http://idea.ed.gov/explore/home

This site was created by the United States Department of Education as a “one-stop shop” for resources related to IDEA. The topics covered include alignment with NCLB, discipline, early intervening services, secondary transition, individualized education programs, and others.

Michigan Alliance for Families http://www.michiganallianceforfamilies.org

This site contains information for children and adults with disabilities who are in the educational system. The Alliance’s goal is to increase family involvement in not only their children’s education but also in education in general.

National Center for Cultural Competence http://www11.georgetown.edu/research/gucchd/nccc/index.html

This site contains information provided by the NCCC to promote increased cultural competence. Of particular interest are the self-assessment checklists that can be found under the “Publications” link.

National Center for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems (NCCRESt). (2008). Building collaboration between schools and parents of English language learners: Transcending barriers, creating opportunities. Retrieved on September 3, 2013, from hhttp://www.nccrest.org/Briefs/PractitionerBrief_BuildingCollaboration.pdf

As the United States’ classrooms become increasingly language-diverse, so too does the need for educators to collaborate with the families of English language learners continue to grow. For a variety of cultural, linguistic, and socio-economic reasons, however, such collaboration can be difficult to achieve. This brief from the NCCRESt lays out many of the reasons for those difficulties and suggests some well-considered strategies for overcoming them.

National Center for Culturally Responsive Educational Systems (NCCRESt)—Becoming Culturally Responsive Educators: Rethinking Teacher Education Pedagogy http://www.nccrest.org/Briefs/Teacher_Ed_Brief.pdf

This publication from NCCRESt addresses the challenges related to diversity in teacher education programs and describes the traits of culturally responsive teachers.

National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities http://www.nichcy.org

This site contains information on infants, toddlers, children, and adolescents with disabilities. It also provides research-based information on educational practices and resources on IDEA and No Child Left Behind.

National Early Childhood Technical Assistance Center http://www.nectac.org

NECTAC is an organization within the United States Office of Special Education Programs that seeks to strengthen state and local services to ensure that children with disabilities up to age five receive research-based, culturally-appropriate supports and services.

No Child Left Behind—Engaging Parents in Education: Lessons from Five Parental Information and Resource Centers http://www.ed.gov/admins/comm/parents/parentinvolve/index.html

This publication details strategies used by Parent Information Resource Centers (PIRCs) to enhance parental involvement in public schools. The two-part guide covers building understanding of NCLB and preparing parents to take action for student learning.

PACER Center http://www.pacer.org

This site is a parent training and information center for families and youth with disabilities. Included is information for families and professionals on disability-related topics such as education, vocational training, and other services for children with disabilities.

Southwest Educational Development Laboratory http://www.sedl.org

The Southwest Educational Development laboratory (SEDL) is a private, nonprofit education research, development, and dissemination corporation based in Austin, Texas, that focuses on improving teaching and learning.

Technical Assistance ALLIANCE for Parent Centers & National Parent Technical Assistance Center. (2008). Fostering parent and professional collaboration. Retrieved on September 3, 2013, from http://www.parentcenternetwork.org/assets/files/Parent%20and%20Professional%20Collaboration%20Research%20Brief%20-%20Final.pdf

This informative guide to creating better and more useful collaborations between parents and education professionals includes a timeline of the relevant research, notes on overcoming communication barriers, models for emulation, and lists of steps toward meaningful partnerships for both parents and professionals, among much else.

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