Resources

Page 10: References & Additional Resources

To cite this Module, please use the following:

The IRIS Center. (2016). Youth with disabilities in juvenile corrections (part 1): Improving instruction. Retrieved from https://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/module/jj1/

References

Blomberg, T. G., Bales, W. D., & Piquero, A. R. (2012). Is educational achievement a turning point for incarcerated delinquents across race and sex? Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 41(2), 202216.

Cruise, K. R., Evans, L. J., & Pickens, I. B. (2011). Integrating mental health and special education needs into comprehensive service planning for juvenile offenders in long-term custody settings. Learning and Individual Differences, 21, 30–40.

Deitch, M., & the National Institute of Corrections. (2016). Establishing a therapeutic culture that supports behavior management. Retrieved from http://www.desktopguide.info/?q=node/21

Duncan, A., & Holder, E. H. (2014). Letter to the Chief State School Officers and State Attorneys General. Washington, D.C.: United States Department of Education, United Stated Department of Justice.

Geib, C. F., Chapman, J. F., D’Amaddio, A. H., & Grigorenko, E. L. (2011). The education of juveniles in detention: Policy considerations and infrastructure development. Learning and Individual Differences, 21, 3–11.

Gagnon, J. C., & Barber, B. (2010). Characteristics of and services provided to youth in secure care facilities. Behavioral Disorders, 36(1), 7–19.

Gagnon, J. C., & Barber, B. (2014). Instructional practice guide for teaching reading and mathematics in juvenile correctional schools. The Journal of Correctional Education, 65(3), 5–23.

Gagnon, J. C., Barber, B., Van Loan, C., & Leone, P. (2009). Juvenile correctional schools: Characteristics and approaches to curriculum. Education and Treatment of Children, 32(4), 673–696.

Gagnon, J. C., Read, N. W., & Gonsoulin, S. (2015). Key Considerations in Providing a Free Appropriate Public Education for Youth with Disabilities in Juvenile Justice Secure Care Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Neglected or Delinquent Children and Youth (NDTAC). Retrieved from http://www.neglected-delinquent.org/sites/default/files/NDTAC_Issue_Brief_FAPE_12_15.pdf

Gonsoulin, S., Darwin, M. J., & Read, N. W. (2012). Providing Individually Tailored Academic and Behavioral Support Services for Youth in the Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare Systems. Washington, DC: The National Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Neglected or Delinquent Children and Youth (NDTAC). Retrieved from http://www.neglected-delinquent.org/sites/default/files/docs/NDTAC_PracticeGuide_IndividualSrvcs.pdf

Gonsoulin, S., Griller Clark, H., & Rankin, V. E. (2015). Quality education services are critical for youth involved with the juvenile justice and child welfare systems. Washington, DC: The National Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Neglected or Delinquent Children and Youth (NDTAC). Retrieved from http://www.neglected-delinquent.org/sites/default/files/NDTAC_Correctional_ED_Practice_Guide_508.pdf

Johnson, L. E., Wang, E. W., Gilinsky, N., He, Z., Carpenter, C., Nelson, C. M., & Scheuermann, B. K. (2013). Youth outcomes following implementation of universal SW-PBIS strategies in a Texas secure juvenile facility. Education and Treatment of Children, 36(3), 135145.

Jolivette, K. (2016). Multi-Tiered Systems of Support in Residential Juvenile Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Neglected or Delinquent Children and Youth (NDTAC). Retrieved from http://www.neglected-delinquent.org/sites/default/files/NDTAC-IssueBrief-508.pdf

Jolivette, K., & Nelson, C. M. (2010). Adapting positive behavioral interventions and supports for secure juvenile justice settings: Improving facility-wide behavior. Behavioral Disorders, 36(1), 28–42.

Leone, P., & Weinberg, L. (2012). Addressing the unmet educational needs of children and youth in the juvenile justice and child welfare systems. Center for Juvenile Justice Reform report. Retrieved from http://cjjr.georgetown.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/EducationalNeedsofChildrenandYouth_May2010.pdf

Leone, P. E., & Wruble, P. C. (2015). Education services in juvenile corrections: 40 years of litigation and reform. Education and Treatment of Children, 38(4), 587–604.

Maccini, P., Gagnon, J. C., Mulcahy, C. A., & Leone, P. E. (2006). Math instruction for committed youth within juvenile correctional schools. The Journal of Correctional Education, 57(3), 210–229.

Mathur, S. R., & Schoenfeld, N. (2010). Effective instructional practices in juvenile justice facilities. Behavioral Disorders, 36(1), 20–27.

Musgrove, M., & Yudin, M. K. (2014). Dear Colleague Letter on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act for Students with Disabilities in Correctional Facilities. Washington, D.C.: United States Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services.

Nelson, C. M., Scott, T. M., Gagnon, J. C., Jolivette, K., & Sprague, J. R. (2008). Positive behavior support in the juvenile justice system. PBIS Newsletter, 4(3). Retrieved from https://www.pbis.org/common/cms/files/Newsletter/Volume4%20Issue3.pdf

Osher, D., Sidana, A., & Kelly, P. (2008). Improving Conditions for Learning for Youth Who Are Neglected or Delinquent. Washington, DC: The National Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Neglected or Delinquent Children and Youth (NDTAC). Retrieved from http://www.neglected-delinquent.org/sites/default/files/ImprovingConditionsforLearningforYouthWhoAreNeglectedorDelinquent.pdf

Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) Center. (n.d.). Juvenile implementation features. Retrieved from https://www.pbis.org/community/juvenile-justice/juvenile-implementation-features

Positive Behavioral Interventions & Supports (PBIS) Center. (n.d.). Positive behavior interventions and supports for youth at-risk and involved in juvenile corrections. Retrieved from https://www.pbis.org/community/juvenile-justice

Steele, J. L., Bozick, R., & Davis, L. M. (2016). Education for incarcerated juveniles: A meta-analysis. Journal of Education for Students Placed at Risk, 21(2), 6589.

Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services. (2014). Correctional education in juvenile justice facilities. Guidance Package. Retrieved from http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/correctional-education/index.html

U.S. Department of Education, & U.S. Department of Justice. (2014). Guiding principles for providing high-quality education in juvenile justice secure care settings. Retrieved from http://www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/correctional-education/guiding-principles.pdf

U.S. Department of Justice, & Hockenberry, S. (2016). Juveniles in residential placement, 2013. Juvenile Justice Statistics National Report Series. Retrieved from http://www.ojjdp.gov/pubs/249507.pdf

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. (n.d.). Statistical briefing book. Retrieved from http://www.ojjdp.gov/ojstatbb/

Wilkerson, K. L., Gagnon, J. C., Mason-Williams, L., & Lane, H. B. (2012). Reading instruction for students with high-incidence disabilities in juvenile corrections. Preventing School Failure, 56(4), 219–231.

Additional Resources

Articles

Sprague, J. R., Scheuermann, B., Wang, E., Nelson, C. M., Jolivette, K., & Vincent, C. (2013). Adopting and adapting PBIS for secure juvenile justice settings: Lessons learned. Education and Treatment of Children, 36(3), 121–134.

This article examines the realities of adapting PBIS to secure juvenile facilities. Included are notes and information on facility wide implementation systems, assessments, lessons learned, and much more.

Reichert, M., & Hawley, R. (2013). Relationships play primary role in boys’ learning. Phi Delta Kappan, 94(8), 49-53. Retrieved from http://www.jcsd.k12.or.us/sites/jcsd.k12.or.us/files/files/relationships%20play%20primary%20role%20in%20boys’%20learning.pdf

The authors of this article stress the crucial role of positive relationships in the education of boys and young men. Included are notes on the positive steps necessary to achieve the goal of strengthening engagement with school, as well as information on how to turn around relationships that have become troubled.

Online Resources

Center for Parent Information and Resources. (2016, September). Reaching and serving students with disabilities in juvenile justice. Archived Webinar. Retrieved from http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/webinar17-juvenilejustice/

The experts in this Webinar co-hosted by the Center for Parent Information and Resources offer a policy perspective on the education of young people in juvenile justice facilities. Among the topics at hand is the impact of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) and thoughts on some effective ways to help support the families of students.

Farmer, R. W., Brooks, C. C., & the National Institute of Corrections. (n.d.). Chapter 13: Education. Retrieved from http://www.desktopguide.info/?q=node/19

This chapter on the creation and successful implementation of education programs for young people in detention facilities includes notes on the creation of a culture of learning, the roles of program administrators, examples of program mission statements, and information on the hiring and retention of educators, among much more.

National Center on Intensive Intervention. (n.d.). Behavior: Strategies and sample resources. Retrieved from http://www.intensiveintervention.org/behavior-strategies-and-sample-resources

Visit this Webpage to find and download resources related to behavior strategies that include self-management, antecedent modification, reinforcement, and much more.

National Center on Intensive Intervention. (2015, September). Bringing it together: Why it is important to integrate academics and behavior when thinking about intensive intervention. Archived Webinar. Retrieved from http://www.intensiveintervention.org/video-resource/bringing-it-together-why-it-important-integrate-academics-and-behavior-when-thinking

In this Webinar, the presenters offer information on the inter-relation between successful academic outcomes and effective classroom behavior management. Among other topics, the presenters discuss the use of data-based individualization to help achieve integrated behavioral support.

U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. (n.d.). Meeting the educational needs of system-involved youth. Retrieved from http://www.ojjdp.gov/programs/System_Involved_Youth.html

The information in this section of the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention’s Website includes links to a correctional education guidance package, Department of Justice resources, an extensive list of additional resources, and more.

Websites

The National Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Neglected or Delinquent Children and Youth http://www.neglected-delinquent.org/

NDTAC makes available a wide variety of information and resources about students in juvenile justice detention facilities and at-risk youth. Topic areas to explore include teaching and learning, transition, safe and supportive learning environments, and much more.

Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention http://www.ojjdp.gov

The U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) works with state and federal agencies and others to improve and expand policies and practices related to youth either already in the juvenile corrections system or at risk of being so. OJJDP’s Website offers information in state and national programs, data and statistics, and resources and tools.

Postive Behavioral Interventions and Supports https://www.pbis.org/

This OSEP technical assistance center is tasked “to define, develop, and evaluate a multi-tiered approach to Technical Assistance that improves the capacity of states, districts, and schools to establish, scale-up, and sustain the PBIS framework.” Visitors to the center’s Website will find resources on a host of topics, including student evaluation, juvenile justice, bullying prevention, and family/school partnerships.

Additional IRIS Resources

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